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The weapons: foil

WEAPON: The foil is a light and flexible weapon for thrusting. For electric scoring the 'electric' foil has a push-button to register a hit.
RULES: Protocol determines the behaviour of fencers and the referee’s command is law. The right of way determines who scores. In foil the target area is the torso.
TACTICS: These include various ways of parrying and attacking, “faking” actions, provoking reactions and quickly scoring on mistakes. Posture, balance, speed, and quick footwork are the key to good timing and distance control.

The weapons: épée

WEAPON: The épée is heavier and stiffer, but like the foil, a thrusting weapon. For electric scoring the 'electric' épée has a push-button to register a touch.
RULES: Protocol determines the behaviour of fencers and the referee’s command is law. In épée the target is the entire body. No right of way rules, every hit counts.
TACTICS: These include various parries and attacks, “faking” actions, provocing reactions and quickly scoring on mistakes. Posture, balance, speed, and quick footwork are the key to good timing and distance control.

The weapons: sabre

WEAPON: The sabre is a 'cutting' weapon: points may be scored with the edges, sides and point of the blade in both thrusting and slashing.
RULES: Protocol determines the behaviour of fencers and the referee’s command is law. You must have the right of way to score. Everything above the waist is target area.
TACTICS: These include various ways of parries and attacks, “faking”, provocing reactions and quickly scoring on mistakes. Posture, balance, speed, and quick footwork are the key to good timing and distance control.

Fencing excersises (click for instructions)

engarde.pdf EFC Privacy Policy.pdf Mail: info@estecfencingclub.eu

The history of fencing

Modern fencing started in the 18th century and is derived from "defence". Classical fencing derives from the 19th and early–20th century national fencing schools in Italy and France. The foil was invented in France as a training technique in the middle of the 18th century; it enabled fast and elegant thrust fencing with a smaller weapon than a dueling sword. After World War II, dueling went out of use in Europe. Training for duels, once fashionable for the aristocracy disappeared. Fencing continued as a sport, with tournaments. Starting with épée in 1936, Electrical scoring started in 1936 for more accurate scoring.

legwork.pdf positions.pdf lunge.pdf target.pdf

En Garde

Legwork

Positions

Lunge

Target practice